123GiveLife.com

Are you pregnant? Need Help? At 123GiveLife.com you can find a pregnancy help center in Wisconsin near you. Just enter your zip code.

TeenBreaks.com

TeenBreaks.com gives you detailed information on pregnancy and abortion plus help in dealing with both. Girls who aborted tell their own stories about why they chose abortion, what the abortion was like, and how they feel now.

OptionLine.org

A project of Heartbeat International, is a state-of-the-art helpline that employs trained phone consultants who are available 24/7 to assist women in crisis and to directly connect them to local pregnancy help centers.To get help by phone: Call toll free, 1-877-877-9027 or, text the word "option" to 95495

NightingaleAlliance.org

Wisconsin Right to Life founded the Nightingale Alliance in 2002. This is the site for important, up-to-date information on physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia

National Right to Life Committee - NRLC.org

National Right to Life’s website provides resources and information on federal right-to-life issues and legislation, compiled by the most esteemed national pro-life organization.

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Adoption

Her Gift of Love -- A true story of adoption

Anonymous
Her baby girl was not given a very good chance to live. She had a heart anomaly when she was born. Only time would tell whether she would survive, and for how long.

The hospital staff cared deeply for this frail little girl and fell in love with her and gently nurtured her. Her birthmother, saddened by placing her baby for adoption, quietly left the hospital a few days after her daughter’s birth. All her dreams had been shattered when the baby’s father, whom she thought would marry her, left her alone and frightened after she told him she was pregnant. She went to live with her father.

But her little daughter, Bernadette, was placed for adoption with a loving family who, while they knew she had a bad heart, loved her all the more and cherished her each day as though it might be her last. But the little girl had a strong will and lived. She loved the outdoors, flowers, music, dancing, people, and pets of any kind. She stole people’s hearts with her blue eyes and charming smile. She was always bringing home lost animals to Mom and Dad.

Bernadette wondered what her mother looked like and wanted to meet her some day. Sadly, this would not be possible as her adoption search revealed that her birthmother died in her mid-30s. But Bernadette loved her birthmother for the gift of life she had given her, and for the courage to place her with a warm, loving adoptive family. Bernadette still misses her birthmother and one day will be able to thank her for the gifts of life and love when she reaches heaven.

Bernadette uses her gift of life and her love of life to help others have a better chance at life by volunteering at a local hospice, at her church and through her social work career.

You can receive pregnancy counseling and more information about adoption by calling, toll free 1-800-395-HELP. When you call, someone who cares about you and your baby will talk with you and answer your questions. There is no obligation.

A complete listing of Wisconsin pregnancy help centers can be found online.

View a listing of Wisconsin's licensed adoption agencies.


If you find yourself facing an unplanned pregnancy, adoption will be one of the most important options you consider. Adoption is not a perfect system, but when choosing between life-giving adoption, and abortion, which takes your unborn baby’s life, the choice is clear. Whichever decision you make, you will always be a mother – of an infant placed with a loving family, or of a child whose death you will always remember.

If at anytime during your decision-making process you feel forced or pressured toward "only one solution" by someone – a boyfriend, parent or clinic worker – you would be wise to consult others whom you trust.

A complete listing of Wisconsin pregnancy help centers can be found online.

View a listing of Wisconsin's licensed adoption agencies.

I don't want to abort my baby. What are my options?
If you have been honest with yourself, you realize that you are in a difficult situation. No one can change that. No matter how you choose to deal with your pregnancy, no decision will be easy. Following your choice to give your baby life will require courage. Let's examine your options.

  • Raising Your Child Yourself 
    This means your child will be fully dependent on you for her or his needs. This requires love, encouragement, time and, of course, food, clothing, shelter and education. This may seem like more than you can handle, and you may be right. But you also may be underestimating yourself. Discuss this option completely with family members and mature adults whose judgment you trust. Raising your child yourself may be difficult, but it can prove to be most rewarding with a good support system. Nothing compares to the love of a child for his or her mother. 

  • Marry the Father and Raise Your Child as a Family 
    You also want to consider how the father may be able to support you and the child. If the father can help you provide a safe, positive environment, then your child will benefit. Loving two-parent families where both the father and mother take their responsibilities seriously and help to support each other provide a much more positive environment for the physical and emotional health of your child. You and the baby's father should explore these issues together before you make a decision. 

  • Shared Parenting or Grandparenting 
    This means that you and your parents raise your child as a family effort. Many children have grown up happily in the stable environment provided by a mother and loving grandparents. This option requires that your parents have the time, resources (and most importantly) the willingness to help you raise your child. Challenging? Maybe, but this option may be a good way to parent while you juggle your school or career schedule. Of course, if there is any ongoing pattern of drug, alcohol, physical or sexual abuse in your home, then shared parenting is clearly not an option for you and your baby.

Placing Your Child for Adoption
Adoption options today are very different than they were 40 or 50 years ago. When you placed your baby back then, you were never able to see your child or know how he or she was doing. Today adoption searches have reunited many families.

There are three different types of legal adoption: Open, Semi-open and Closed.

  • Open – You can choose the family to raise your child, and even though your child is legally adopted by the couple, you have the legal option of seeing your child and receiving information on your child’s development. Once the child reaches the age of 18, if both parties are willing to meet, you can meet your child and reveal your identity. 

  • Semi-open Adoption – You again have the choice of choosing the family for your child. But, in this situation you can only receive information about your child; you can not visit the child until he/she is 18 years of age and agreeable to meeting with you.

  • Closed Adoption -- In this case, you work with an agency to place your child for adoption for you. Once your child is placed, you may not have contact with your child or learn of his or her progress until the age of 18. You may meet only if the child wishes to meet with you.

You, with your trusted adoption counselor, will make the decision which is best for you and your baby. In any of these situations, you never forget your child, and placing your child is emotionally a hard decision. There will be a grieving process for your child. But you always know that you gave your child two gifts: the gift of life and the gift of a loving family. You have also given yourself two gifts -- knowing that someday you can see your child again and being able to move on with your life, knowing that your child will be loved and cared for.

Can an adoptive parent love my baby as much as I would?
Yes. People who adopt do so not because they have room for a child in their homes, but because they have room in their hearts! Adoptive parents will tell you that they love their adopted children every bit as much as they love their genetic children. The elements of good parenting are the same for all kids, adopted or otherwise: love that is unconditional, and care and commitment to nurturing.


If you find yourself facing an unplanned pregnancy, adoption will be one of the most important options you consider. Adoption is not a perfect system, but when choosing between life-giving adoption, and abortion, which takes your unborn baby’s life, the choice is clear. Whichever decision you make, you will always be a mother – of an infant placed with a loving family, or of a child whose death you will always remember.

If at anytime during your decision-making process you feel forced or pressured toward "only one solution" by someone – a boyfriend, parent or clinic worker – you would be wise to consult others whom you trust.

A complete listing of Wisconsin pregnancy help centers can be found online.

View a listing of Wisconsin's licensed adoption agencies.


Legally, an adoption could be reversed if the legal birth father has not signed away his parental rights to his child. By the same token, if either the birth mother or father has been coerced into placing a child for adoption, the same thing could happen.

When birth mothers are counseled regarding an adoption option, she is generally told what her legal rights are. However, the same may not be true for the birth father, since his identity may not have been revealed and he may not know of the pregnancy.

This site offers several resources for fathers who may be facing an adoption placement of his child. As the birth father (with paternity of the father having been proven), he has legal rights to help decide what is best for his child, just as the birth mother does.

There are many websites available with legal information, but listed below are a few of them for reference and assistance.

You can find the answers to a number of questions concerning paternity (legal fatherhood) and child support at the Child Support Program website provided by the State of Wisconsin, Department of Workforce Development. The Web address is: www.dwd.state.wi.us/bcs


The Adoption Resources of Wisconsin website says this about special needs adoptions: “Special needs adoption is similar to other types of adoption except the child who needs a family has specific conditions that may be linked to disabilities or past mistreatment.”1

There are thousands of children with special needs who need care and a family to love them. Contact the Wisconsin Adoption Information Center for more information, or if you should be interested in international adoptions, contact Bethany Christian Services at 1-800-Bethany.

A complete listing of Wisconsin pregnancy help centers can be found online.

View a listing of Wisconsin's licensed adoption agencies.